WHEN MALORY MET ARTHUR

Love and Death in Camelot
A Textual Investigation
of Religion and the Supranatural in
Malory's Morte D'Arthur

by

John J. Fritscher, Ph.D.
(aka) Jack Fritscher, Ph.D.


Doctoral Textual Qualification
Director: Rev. Carl J. Stratman, C.S.V.
January 1, 1967
Published Loyola University Library, Chicago IL


The Search For King Arthur, The Grail, Magic,
Women, Family, Courtly Love, and Grace


This book is a discussion of the Malorian statement and dramatization that the individual personality and responsibility must be maintained even within the religious institution. For it is true in a less explicitly symbolic way that all the families, literal and Round Table, go to group destruction while nearly every individual is saved. In this sense, and only in this sense, can Malory be said to have an anti-institutional bias: the institution exists for the individual who is to be educated by and out of the institution to personal, moral-religious responsibility. The institution is means to an end: a healthy insight for a man living at the end of a mono-institutional age fast evolving into an empirical humanistic era.

WHEN MALORY MET ARTHUR -- PDF File

FULL TEXT
SEX AND MAGIC IN KING ARTHUR'S CAMELOT

Copyright 2007 by Jack Fritscher, Ph.D. & Mark Hemry - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED